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  1. #1
    Registered User Nixmommy's Avatar
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    Default Anyone have elevated SED rate and/or C-reactive protein???

    Mine are both up and no one can tell me why. I am interested to know what IBS feels like since Ive seen so many cysters here with it. Can that raise those levels?
    Barb - 36
    dh - Mike - 36
    ds - Nicholas Michael 11-11-98 8lbs. 110z 20 in.
    dd - Hannah Paige 11-8-04 10lbs 9 oz 23 in
    (there will be no more bding in Feb. I have enough November babies!!!)
    Currently taking...no meds except bcp
    Thinking about ttc #3 if dh is willing

  2. #2
    Google Junkie nobimbo's Avatar
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    Didn't you doc want to retest? Many times elevations in SED is a fluke and most docs would retest to be sure. SED can also be temporarily high when you have your period. Unfortunately, both the SED and C-Reactive Protein tests are not able to diagnose anything, but are used as markers of inflammation in the body (which can be caused by a ton of different things). Here is a list of possible reasons for elevated SED:

    Elevated values occur with:

    Kidney disease
    Pregnancy
    Rheumatic fever
    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Severe anemia
    Syphilis
    Systemic lupus erythematosus
    Thyroid disease
    Tuberculosis

    Markedly elevated values occur with:

    Giant cell arteritis
    Multiple myeloma
    Macroglobulinemia - primary
    Hyperfibrinogenemia (elevated fibrinogen levels in the blood)
    Necrotizing vasculitis
    Polymyalgia rheumatica

    So, there can be a relationship between SED and PCOS if you have anemia (which often results from heavy periods) or thyroid disease (common in women with PCOS). When IBS is suspected, docs run a SED test to eliminate other possibilities. IBS does not cause a high SED. Here is an "ask the doctor" article discussing this:

    Irritated Bowel [posted 10/21/98]
    Question: I am 17 years old and I was told I have IBS three years ago and it still bothers me a lot today. I had many tests done, all of which showed that nothing was wrong. The only test that was not normal was for my SED rate which showed it was elevated. What does that mean and what does it indicate? My doctor, who I no longer see anymore, couldn't tell me anything about it. I'd appreciate any information you could give me on this. Thank you.

    Answer: A sedimentation rate is a non-specific measure of inflammation. It will be elevated in all types of disease that causes inflammation from infections to lupus to cancers. It does not diagnose the problem;but, is used as a screen. For example, if you truly have IBS, you should have a normal sed rate. Something is causing the elevated sed rate and needs to be diagnosed. Possibly something with your bowel and you really don't have IBS. It also depends a lot on the magniture of the elevation;that is, a small elevation is usually of no concern-doubling of the ESR would be of concern. Repeat your sed rate with another doctor. If continued elevated, find the cause.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    C-Reactive Protein would also be normal in IBS, not elevated. The doc runs that test to rule out other causes for symptoms. It is a non-specific test that shows inflammation somewhere in the body. It has recently been shown to be a marker for heart disease (so you are at a higher risk for heart problems with a high CRP, no matter where the inflammation is in your body),

    Here is some more detailed info about both of these tests:

    ESR

    Also known as: Sed rate, Sedimentation rate
    Formal name: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
    Related tests: C-reactive protein (CRP), ANA, RF

    The Test

    How is it used?
    When is it ordered?
    What does the test result mean?
    Is there anything else I should know?

    How is it used?
    The ESR is an easy, inexpensive, nonspecific test that has been used for many years to help diagnose conditions associated with acute and chronic inflammation, including infections, cancers, and autoimmune diseases. ESR is said to be nonspecific because increases do not tell the doctor exactly where the inflammation is in your body or what is causing it, and also because it can be affected by other conditions besides inflammation. For this reason, ESR is typically used in conjunction with other tests.

    ESR is helpful in diagnosing two specific inflammatory diseases, temporal arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica. A high ESR is one of the main test results used to confirm the diagnosis. It is also used to monitor disease activity and response to therapy in both of these diseases.


    When is it ordered?
    A physician usually orders an ESR test (along with others) to evaluate a patient who has symptoms that suggest polymyalgia rheumatica or temporal arteritis, such as headaches, neck or shoulder pain, pelvic pain, anemia, unexplained weight loss, and joint stiffness. There are many other conditions that can result in a temporary or sustained elevation in the ESR and some that will cause a decrease.

    Since ESR is a nonspecific marker of inflammation and is affected by other factors, the results must be used along with the doctor’s other clinical findings, the patient’s health history, and results from other appropriate laboratory tests. If the ESR and clinical findings match, the doctor may be able to confirm or rule out a suspected diagnosis. A single elevated ESR, without any symptoms of a specific disease, will usually not give the physician enough information to make a medical decision.

    Before doing an extensive workup looking for disease, a doctor may want to repeat the ESR test after a period of several weeks or months. If a doctor already knows the patient has a disease like temporal arteritis (where changes in the ESR mirror those in the disease process), s/he may order the ESR at regular intervals to assist in monitoring the course of the disease. In the case of Hodgkin’s disease, for example, a sustained elevation in ESR may be a predictor of an early relapse following chemotherapy.



    What does the test result mean?
    NOTE: A standard reference range is not available for this test. Because reference values are dependent on many factors, including patient age, gender, sample population, and test method, numeric test results have different meanings in different labs. Your lab report should include the specific reference range for your test. Lab Tests Online strongly recommends that you discuss your test results with your doctor. For more information on reference ranges, please read Reference Ranges and What They Mean.

    Doctor’s do not base their decisions solely on ESR results. You can have a normal result and still have a problem.

    A very high ESR usually has an obvious cause, such as an acute infection. The doctor will use other follow-up tests, such as cultures, depending on the patient’s symptoms.

    Moderately elevated ESR occurs with inflammation, but also with anemia, infection, pregnancy, and old age.

    A rising ESR can mean an increase in inflammation or a poor response to a therapy; a decreasing ESR can mean a good response.

    A common cause of high ESR is anemia, especially if it is associated with changes in the shape of the red cells; however, some changes in red cell shape (such as sickle cells in sickle cell anemia) lower ESR. Kidney failure will also increase ESR. Persons with multiple myeloma or Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia (tumors that make large amounts of immunoglobulins) typically have very high ESR even if they don't have inflammation.

    Although a low ESR is not usually important, it can be seen with polycythemia (a condition where a patient makes too many red blood cells), with extreme leukocytosis (patient has too many white blood cells), and with some protein abnormalities.
    [Back to top]


    Is there anything else I should know?
    ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP) are both markers of inflammation. Generally, ESR does not change as rapidly as does CRP, either at the start of inflammation or as it goes away. CRP is not affected by as many other factors as is ESR, making it a better marker of inflammation. However, because ESR is an easily performed test, many doctors still use ESR as an initial test when they think a patient has inflammation.

    Females tend to have higher ESR, and menstruation and pregnancy can cause temporary elevations.

    Drugs such as dextran, methyldopa (Aldomet), oral contraceptives, penicillamine procainamide, theophylline, and vitamin A can increase ESR, while aspirin, cortisone, and quinine may decrease it.

    HTH,
    Linda
    dx pcos 1984, type II diabetes 2001, also hypertension
    Met 2000mg since 2001, started Glucophage XR 4/22/04, then switched to Met ER 6/04; also: multi, Vit. C, Vit. E, B12/folic acid combo, fish oil & borage oil combo, garlic capsules, cinnamon, Vitex, calcium with magnesium/zinc, biotin, CoQ10, selenium,iron
    Other meds: Verapamil and Altace(for blood pressure)
    Started laser hair removal 7/29/03, completed 3/04 (it works!)
    UAE for fibroid 3/24/03 and 3/16/04

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  4. #3
    Registered User Nixmommy's Avatar
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    Your detailed response is much appreciated, but I already knew all of that (Ive been researching for two weeks). My problem is that I have no symptoms of anything, but my ESR is elevated (and has been for several years) and so is my CRP (although I have only had this test one time...Im almost tempted to have it run again to make sure it isnt wrong). I was one day form starting my period when the tests were run, so that may partially account for my SED rate, but not my CRP. My CRP is very high (16.3) which scares the heck out of me. How can I have such high levels but have no symptoms of anything? I am very worried.

    But thanks for taking the time to help. I'll keep you posted.

    Barb
    Barb - 36
    dh - Mike - 36
    ds - Nicholas Michael 11-11-98 8lbs. 110z 20 in.
    dd - Hannah Paige 11-8-04 10lbs 9 oz 23 in
    (there will be no more bding in Feb. I have enough November babies!!!)
    Currently taking...no meds except bcp
    Thinking about ttc #3 if dh is willing

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    Registered User makzeen's Avatar
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    I know this thread is YEARS old but I have the exact same symptoms and wonder if this lady found out anything?
    I am due to see an oncologist next week as they think I have blood cancer

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