Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 100
  1. #61
    Registered User sagestory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    132
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I agree that it's a bit scary for them to be figuring out something that might "cause" homosexuality because there will always be people who want to eradicate it. On the one hand, it's great that they're getting closer to showing that it's biological in nature (and therefore not some sinful choice) but on the other hand, I seriously hope they don't start looking at us like we're diseased and trying to find the cure.

  2. #62
    Tattoo Freak tattwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    397
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Very Interesting...

    Wow. Is all I have to say...for now. I need to let this marinate LOL!!!

  3. #63
    Registered User octoberlightning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    31
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I agree with some of you by saying that I don't think anyone needs to find a reason why people are gay. Shows they have nothing else to do and just wants to find something to work on and make us feel bad about ourselves since we are "different" than straight people.

  4. #64
    Registered User glisulste's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    PATIENT(S): Six hundred eighteen women undergoing ovarian stimulation with or without IUI treatment between November 2001 and January 2003. Of these, 254 were self-identified as lesbians and 364 were heterosexual women.

  5. #65
    Registered User slimavar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    That article is a bit frightening. It seems that it could mean by receiving hormone treatment to lower testosterone you could also sacrifice a loving relationship. I hope it is just a correlation, and not some sort of causation between the two, I mean even if high testosterone is only a factor of sexuality, it is still a bit frightening to think ones sexuality could change.
    I've been a boyish-lesbian since I was a young teenager, and have never had feelings for a man and have always had relationships with women. It would be quite a change for me to ever have feelings for a man.

  6. #66
    Registered User joyblack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,990
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 106 Times in 90 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slimavar View Post
    That article is a bit frightening. It seems that it could mean by receiving hormone treatment to lower testosterone you could also sacrifice a loving relationship. I hope it is just a correlation, and not some sort of causation between the two, I mean even if high testosterone is only a factor of sexuality, it is still a bit frightening to think ones sexuality could change.
    I've been a boyish-lesbian since I was a young teenager, and have never had feelings for a man and have always had relationships with women. It would be quite a change for me to ever have feelings for a man.
    That's precisely what they're suggesting. That sexual inclinations are very largely influenced by
    1) testosterone exposure in the first three months of fetal life
    and
    2) testosterone levels in puberty and adult life.

    If you have both, in the same sort of way as is typical for males, then you're likely to have a strong preference for females, rather than males. Not only your body, but your brain gets masculinised.

    However it's not quite as simple as that. If it were that simple, then I'd be very heavily inclined towards females rather than males, but that's not the case with me, even though I suppose I'm fairly heavily masculinised -- moustache and beard growth as heavy as many males, and flat-chested -- female nipples but on a flat chest. What's true statistically isn't going to be true in every instance. For me, the urge for a physical relationship is so strong that it makes me want the sort of relationship that I can't have with a female because I don't have the equipment but I most certainly can have with a male.

  7. #67
    Registered User Ellie 31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Interesting study. Have never read anything with PCOS and lesbianism.

    Another interesting read- more on gays and physical traits covers the finger ratio discussed previously.
    nymag .com/news/features/33520/

  8. #68
    Registered User belvoirm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I don't think that because it is more prevelant in women who are gay, it means that it is somehow linked to sexual orientation. If it were, then why would straight women have PCOS as well? I think this is pretty ridiculous to be honest with you. Like someone said above, it could be because of the habits lesbians tend to have (although I think that is also a bit stereotypical as well). I think that people should stop focusing on the sexual orientation of the people with PCOS and focus on the PCOS itself. I really don't care who has it, there just needs to be more research done to help the people who do have it, whether they are gay, straight, trans, native american, or purple.

  9. #69
    Registered User ascmh1031's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    31
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Interesting read. I have wondered about that myself.

  10. #70
    non mangio la bistecca frozensensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rrowley View Post
    This was something I always fiddled with in the back of my mind...because it seemed to be true in the women I knew with PCOS. It is interesting to see that it really is bearing out to be the case in research.

    Rebecca
    I have thought this as well. I'm on the mend from the PCOS though I do not ever desire to have children(and I'm 38).

    Not sure what people will make of this link, though. I'm glad to see my hypothesis at least validated here!

    Peace,
    Lee
    final PCOS dx: 9-13-2004
    first day of Metformin: 9-13-04
    years with PCOS: 20
    Meds: Metformin ER 1000 BID, Singulair, Magnesium 400 mg QD, Vitamin D, triamterene, combivent as needed, vegan eating**

  11. #71
    Registered User indigomoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wonderland, FL
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    This makes me so upset...
    It's not as though lesbians have it tough or anything (sarchasm). SMH. No wonder my dr. suggested I have "intercourse". I suppose my queer tattoos didn't help the situation.

  12. #72
    Registered User CarpeDiem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I've been struggling with anxiety/depression/anger problems since I was about 13 years old. I finally sought treatment by my regular physician at age 15 (2005). He put me on a medication called Celexa which helped tremendously for about a year and a half. After that, I went back and switched to Prozac. It worked probably about another year and a half and then I just quit taking it all together because it didn't seem my Dr was understanding what I was going through and wouldn't prescribe me the right medicine (or atleast dosage).

    Well, this past year, my anxiety and anger problems have hit an all-time high and I finally went to visit a chemical imbalance Dr and he diagnosed me with ADD. On my 3rd visit (yesterday) he asked me how I was doing with my nightmares. I told him they were somewhat subsiding but I still had them occasionally. I then told him what morbid and aggressive dreams I was having and he just sat and stared at me. He then asked, "You're having your menstrual cycle regularly, right?" I think puzzeledly looked at him and said, "Um...no. Probably about everything 3-4 months." He think asked "How old were you when you started?" I embarrassingly answered, "10 yrs." Then, when he finally asked me if I had any extra hair growth...my heart sank. When I answered "yes" he began to shake his head and tell me he thought I was showing a lot of signs of a disorder called "Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome."

    I thought to myself, "What the hell is this guy talking about?" Of course my first question was, "Does this mean I can't have children?" That was my biggest fear at that moment. The thought of not being able to have a child, or being more likely to miscarriage my child if by chance I DID get pregnant. I came home later that night and have spent last night and part of today reading up on the symptoms and although I have yet to have the tests performed to confirm the diagnosis, I'm positive this is what is wrong with me.

    I know I should not get myself worked up because I'm not promised that I have PCOS. However, I show almost every freakin' sympton I've read so far except for the extreme obesity. Now, after having read about the different symptoms of PCOS and more specifically, the side effects of elevated testosterone levels in women, I am nauseated beyond belief.

    I have been with men in the past, but I've been actively involved in relationships with women since I was 15. I have had boyfriends when I was younger and then just a few random male friends that I would sleep with occasionally but I have always had some sort of a relationship going on with a girl. I know I started having feelings for girls around age 10 (atleast that's the youngest I remember) but I had started my period by then. I tried to have relationships with me but for one reason or another I always found myself bored and unammused and longing for a girl. So, I started dating chicks regularly until I met my girlfriend now of 1 yr and a 1/2. Now while most of my struggle with my sexuality has been with the fact that I come from a very strict conservative religious household, I am very, very, very scared that if I do have PCOS and the Drs lower my testosterone levels, I will lose those feelings of attraction towards women because the testosterone will not be overwhelming my emotions. If this is true, this means that my entire childhood could've been so much easier if someone would've just realised that it was weird for an 8 yr old to be starting puberty, or that I had a deepend voice, or that my periods were way too irregular, etc etc. Furthermore, what if my struggles with homosexuality could have all been prevented if my hormone levels could have been evened out?

    Please, please, please, do not think that I am in ANY way trying to say that homosexuality is a disease or in anyway in need of a "cure." I just know that with my particular case, I have given into my sexual desires for women because I feel more comfortable or "appropriate" in that environment. Don't get me wrong, I used to be quite feminine when I wanted to be and had many guy friends...but as I got older, I started appealing more to the female sex and I have really given up even thinking about making myself available to a male. I love women. I think they're so wonderful and beautiful in so many ways. I love everything about them. With that being said, what if part of this attraction really is due to my elevated testosterone levels? What if, without those "raging teenage boy" hormones, I cease to have this love and passion for women...and with the increase (or balancing) of estrogen in my system, I begin to regain my attraction to men?

    I will be absolutely devastated if I find out that these emotions are a result of a chemical imbalance and with the introduction of excess estrogen hormones, my body will become "normal" and I will take on the traits of a more feminine woman. The fact is, if that is the case, then it's too late now. I would love to have my anxiety and depression finally under control. I would love to a more female voice and body build. I would love all of those things...but not at the expense of who I am. I am gay and I have been this way for what seems like my whole life. 21 years of learning to live life in this body under the circumstances and situations I've been in will not be thrown to the side as the sad result of an undiagnosed uterine disease. I'd rather deal with the side effects and life my life than risk altering who I was born to be.

  13. #73
    Registered User lynnea443lynn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kok1922 View Post
    Hi

    I would encourage all women to read the above article/abstract with a grain of salt. As a public health researcher, I have many questions for these folks. The first one being selection of subjects. The number of lesbians attending this one clinic is absolutely huge. We go to one of the best clinics in NYC area and I have yet to see another lesbian there. It's a little odd that they were able to find so many lesbians in one place. Fascinating, actually. Numbers are actually a huge probelm when conducting research on gays and lesbians - just finding enough of them to do a study on takes a ton of money and a ton of time. I want to know how in the world they found so many out lesbians in Spain?

    Secondly, maybe the women that sought treatment were more likely to have PCOs but it doesn't meant that ALL lesbians are more likely to have PCOs. Maybe this clinic is lesbian friendly or maybe word of mouth help set it up so lesbians with PCOs - or an inkling of PCOs go there.

    The only way to really research this correctly would be to randomly select women and ask them to be in the research study.

    I really believe that some researchers are LOOKING for a way to explain homosexuality and ignore good science.

    So, that's just my two bits. All the best to everyone.

    Kelly

    This is a great way to summarize the problems with this study! Another study, "PCOS in lesbian and heterosexual women treated with artificial donor insemination" by Petra DeSutter re-researched this question, attempting to corroborate the findings stated, "Data were collected from patient files and 174 lesbian and 200 heterosexual women were included in this study. The diagnosis of PCOS was made following the Rotterdam PCOS consensus workshop group. A total of 8.0% of the lesbian women had PCOS compared with 8.7% of the heterosexual women. Concerning the presence of polycystic ovaries and cycle length and regularity, no significant differences were found."

    Ultimately, stories from one study have to be corroborated with others before they can be deemed true, and in this case, I think the margin for error is REALLY high!

  14. #74
    Registered User Cole427's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    For some reason this scares me. I'm bisexual and I strongly think I have PCOS. Strangeee.

  15. #75
    Registered User lilsharong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Gay. DC queer woman. Anyone want a summer workout buddy?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •