Insulin Resistance Must Do's

Clinical nutrition will fail. Insulin resistance cannot be corrected by diet alone. There are several “MUST DO’s” for the person with insulin resistance to get better.

  1. Supplements
  2. Eat within your carbohydrate tolerance
  3. Stop eating between meals
  4. Exercise

Are you suffering from Insulin Resistance?

  • Fatigue after meals
  • Crave sweets during the day
  • Eating sweets does not relieve cravings for sugar
  • Must have sweets after meals
  • Waist girth is equal or larger than hip girth
  • Frequent urination
  • Increased thirst & appetite
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Afternoon coffee at Starbucks


What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance plays a major role in a vicious cycle that alters hormone metabolism towards androgen dominance. Androgen is the generic term for any steroid hormone that stimulates or controls the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics. They are also the precursor of all estrogens, the female and male sex hormones. Androgen Dominance may eventually lead into PMS, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, ovarian cysts and tumors. It is the most common female hormone disorder in menstruating women. PCOS is primarily characterized by hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance and chronic menstrual irregularities. Symptoms of androgen disorders tend to appear gradually over a number of years and range from mild to serious. They include irregular periods, infertility, unexplained weight gain, fluid retention, fatigue, mood swings, and acne beyond puberty, hair loss, and unwanted hair growth. Insulin resistance is associated with estrogen proliferative cancers, acanthosis nigricans (darkening of the skin, age or liver spots), increased cardiovascular disease and elevated cholesterol / triglyceride levels.

Insulin resistance occurs when the normal amount of insulin secreted by the pancreas is not able to unlock the door to cells. This is due to free radicals damaging the receptor sites on the cells. Think of it as a lock and key. Insulin – a hormone – is the key. The receptor site is the lock. Free radicals are vandals.

The vandals (free radicals) damage the lock which prevents the key from working. Unable to unlock the door, your body can not provide your cells with glucose. Your body produces more insulin which is unusable due to the damaged locks (receptor sites). Now the glucose and insulin stay in your blood stream. Some of the glucose and insulin are converted into vandals (oxidized into free radicals), and the glucose is converted into fat cells. Your body still needs energy and provides it through a process in the liver. The by-products of this process are weight gain, high cholesterol & triglycerides, and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

These by-products are then collectively called Syndrome X. The apple shaped body is often blamed for causing these by-products. This is “worst comes first” thinking. The by-products of insulin resistance cause the apple shaped body.

When the body looses the ability to transport glucose into the cells, due to inflammation damaging the insulin receptor sites, glucose stays in circulation and is oxidized into free radicals, which cause further damage or is made into fat cells. We loose the ability to produce energy for muscle movement. The person becomes lethargic, further decreasing the demand for energy, and Mitochondria – our cellular power plants – shut down, further decreasing our need for glucose. But we are still eating, putting food into our body, which is then stored as fat. Fat cells make estrogen. Excess estrogen lowers thyroid function so the body can not break down fat for energy, making it impossible to loose weight.

Exercise is necessary to reactivate the mitochondria, which enables the body to burn off excess energy of the blood sugar. This decreases the free radical production and reduces the cellular damage. After the damage stops the body can repair. Clinical Nutrition alone will fail in treating these conditions. There are four “must do’s” to repair Insulin Resistance.

Several key factors are involved with Insulin Resistance:

Anemia
Food Sensitivities
Elevated Cholesterol/Triglycerides

There are several key factors involved in blood sugar disorders. Anemia, food sensitivities, and elevated cholesterol/triglycerides all have a direct impact on blood sugar. It is not possible to improve adrenal/blood sugar patterns if the patient is anemic. When an individual loses the ability to transport glucose into their cells, the body will resort to fat production and subsequently increase cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Food sensitivities that result in an immune hypersensitivity response will have powerful impacts on blood sugar stability.

If a patient is anemic, they will not be able to deliver oxygen to the mitochondria for ATP production and become dependent upon a process in the liver called glycolysis for energy production. Glycolyis is an inefficient ATP pathway and will place great demands upon the blood sugar/adrenal stabilizing system. Insulin resistance and anemia commonly occur with an inflammation from the food sensitivities. Iron supplementation in the presence of inflammation will increase free radicals enhancing the inflammatory processes. It is important to know that the inflammation must be eliminated before treating the anemia or using iron supplementation.

High cholesterol is the major problem with insulin resistance. The most common lifestyle recommendation is low fat/high carbohydrate diet which many find unsuccessful in lowering their cholesterol. Especially in light of the studies that report that only 15% of your total cholesterol can be controlled through diet. Carbohydrates, which are complex sugar, are the very thing that the body loses the ability to utilize with Insulin Resistance. Until recently, blood sugar and cholesterol were looked at as separate issues. Now, we know they are directly related. Remember, when an individual loses the ability to transport glucose into their cells, the body will resort into shifting the blood sugar into fat (lipogenesis) and therefore abnormal cholesterol levels will be seen. Elevation in cholesterol and triglycerides are very helpful in identifying stages of blood sugar disorders.

Insulin Resistance Warning

The ligans in Flax Seed oil are useful in helping insulin bind to receptor sites. Insulin Resistance doesn’t respond well to Flax Seed oil because inflammation will cause the essential fatty acids (EFA's) to shift into inflammatory pathways, thus increasing inflammation in the body. If a person responds well to aspirin, it is likely that this is occurring. Use high amounts of OmegaCO-3 fish oils, Green Tea, and Garlic to quench inflammatory aracodonic pathways with Insulin Resistance.

Insulin Resistance Must Do's

Clinical nutrition will fail. Insulin resistance cannot be corrected by diet alone. There are several “MUST DO’s” for the person with insulin resistance to get better.

  1. Supplements
  2. Eat within your carbohydrate tolerance
  3. Stop eating between meals
  4. Exercise


Carbohydrate Tolerance

Carb Tolerance: Fatigue after meals, craving sugar after meals:

- You have exceeded your Carbohydrate Tolerance if you become fatigued or crave sugar after meals.

- Cut back on carbs until you are no longer sleepy after meals and/or do not crave sugar after eating.

- If you reduce carbs until you are eating none and still have symptoms

do Glysen Dosing until symptoms disappear as this is corrected the need for Glysen should eventually go down.

SOURCE: http://www.wellnessalternatives-stl.com/index.html
Wellness Alternatives is a medical practice specializing in Alternative Therapies, and pcos is listed on their website.