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  1. #1
    Registered User maiseycat's Avatar
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    Default Hypothyroidism and Maca?

    I've been taking maca for PCOS for one month. It has really helped with energy levels and PCOS symptoms. But now I'm reading that Hashimotos hypothyroid women should not take maca. I'm totally confused. My doctor never mentioned Hashimotos so how do I know if that is the cause of my hypothyroidism? I just thought it was hereditary, but I keep reading that most hypo. is caused by Hashimotos. How do I know if I have it and do I really need to stop taking maca? It is so confusing because I keep reading how maca helps the thyroid, and on the other hand, I'll read that Hashimotos people shouldn't take it. Should I assume I don't have Hashis since my doctor never mentioned it? I feel like I have no so much going on with my health - it's like a full time job. Sometimes I seriously want to give up on life altogether.... You find something that works for you, and then that something has to be wrong or bad.

  2. #2
    Registered User lulou's Avatar
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    Hi Maiseycat,
    I am also hypothyroid and taking maca (for about 2.5 months). I started taking it because I am a fan of Mary J. Shomon's books and I happened to pick up her book the Menopause Thyroid Solution and happened to open it to a section on Maca. She doesn't say anything about it not being good for Hashimotos- in fact it seems she gives it a strong endorsement. As it provides nutritional support for the entire endocrine system- adrenals, thyroid and ovaries, AND regulates the menstrual cycle- and is a natural remedy which has been used for centuries in Peru- I am all for it!
    I know that the amount of information out there is extremely confusing- the minute you read that something is good, you can find more information on the same thing that says it is just as bad. As a result I have become extremely critical of the sources of information. /
    Can you just ask your doctor to give you a more clear diagnosis?
    also if you feel better taking maca- it seems like it wouldn't be harming you?
    Don't give up!!
    the other thing about herbs is that they do take more time and patience- and effort to find the information.
    The books/sources of best information that I trust:
    The Ultimate PCOS Handbook= Colette Harris & Theresa Cheung- (no mention of maca- but lots of other herbs and vitamin advice)
    All thyroid books by Mary J. Shomon (menopause one mentioned above is only one which mentions maca)-
    Herbal Defense by Robin Landis
    Taking Charge of Your Fertility- Toni Weschler- (not so much about PCOS, but how to read your cycle etc. and know what is going on with your body)
    good luck and have faith!
    Multivitamin, Fish Oil, Cinnamon B, complex Vit B6/B5 combo, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Vit D, Spirilina, Evening Primrose Oil (second half of cycle),Maca, Ashwaganda, milk thistle (for liver cleansing), synthroid (I am hypothyroid),High Fibre- IR diet, Daily Excercise. I am trying to gain all of the above vitamins from food sources (and would eventually like to only supplement with Fish Oils, Spirilina, vit d, and herbs).

  3. #3
    Registered User maiseycat's Avatar
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    Thank you, Lulou. Really, it was only a couple of sites that mentioned this - one said that maca can cause goiters in people with Hashi's. The other was an ehow article about maca that actually mentioned this website as their source saying that posters at soulcysters.com said that maca binds T3 at the cellular level in people with Hashi's so should not be taken for Hashi's hypothyroidism. But, strange, I can not find anything about this here. I haven't done any in depth searches though - I put in maca and hypothyroid and got a ton of threads.

    It is confusing to me because, of course, I don't have a good understanding of how all of this works. I would *think* just from basic reading I've done that T3 would be more of an issue with secondary hypothyroidism rather than Hashis but I really don't know. I should educate myself more on this stuff. I tend to grab something new and try it out of desperation after hearing others' success stories. Maca just happens to work great for me when I could not stomach metformin at all. Though I don't want to risk my thyroid getting out of whack, I do want to stay with what works for me. I still go through some moodswings, but they were nothing compared to how they were on met or with taking nothing at all. And my energy levels are so much better - I don't know how maca could be anything but good for hypothyroidism. I will go back to my doctor if I notice hypothyroid symptoms returning. He never gave me much info to begin with when I was dxed. He explained that my TSH has been high and in the last test, my T4 (and maybe T3?) was off, so I was definitely hypothyroid. I don't know anything about Hashis other than it sounds like what I have. I just though hypo was solely a hereditary thing and there was no rhyme or reason for it. I definitely haven't had thyroid injuries, surgery, or anything like that...

  4. #4
    Registered User lulou's Avatar
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    Hypothyroidism seems to be quite common for women- especially as we get older and bodies stop producing as many hormones. It is VERY common for women. I don't think that anyone really knows why. My doctor wasn't that informative for me either- but my hypothyroidism was caught very early.
    I definately feel better since I started Maca, watching my diet, excercising and using herbs and vitamins for those things that I feel I am not getting in my diet.
    I also drink a south american tea called yerba mate when I want an afternoon pick me up. the best brand is 'Guayaki' which has a nice chocolatte flavour or I make regular yerba mate into a cold limeade by adding lime and stevia ( you just shake a teabag in a water bottle and make instant iced tea!). Yerba mate is an herb which is caffeine free, but provides energy and produces mental clarity when you drink it. I believe it is also beneficial for the adrenals. It too has been used for centuries in South America! I found this brand at whole foods, but I am sure you will find the herb tea in some form at any healthfood store. It comes as green tea or roasted.
    There is so much information to get through when you are first diagnosed- I spent the first two months reading about it every night- I had never heard of hypothyroidism before I was diagnosed.
    Oh and I have read that it can take up to 3 months for herbs to begin working. But I really believe that they do!
    again i found the Herbal Defense book which I mentioned above to be the BEST source regarding herbs and their benefits that I have ever read. I first got my library to order it in for me, but was so impressed I ordered a copy. that is where I found out about yerba mate (but they do not talk about maca at all).
    Multivitamin, Fish Oil, Cinnamon B, complex Vit B6/B5 combo, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Vit D, Spirilina, Evening Primrose Oil (second half of cycle),Maca, Ashwaganda, milk thistle (for liver cleansing), synthroid (I am hypothyroid),High Fibre- IR diet, Daily Excercise. I am trying to gain all of the above vitamins from food sources (and would eventually like to only supplement with Fish Oils, Spirilina, vit d, and herbs).

  5. #5
    Registered User lulou's Avatar
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    Hypothyroidism seems to be quite common for women- especially as we get older and bodies stop producing as many hormones. It is VERY common for women. I don't think that anyone really knows why. My doctor wasn't that informative for me either- but my hypothyroidism was caught very early.
    I definately feel better since I started Maca, watching my diet, excercising and using herbs and vitamins for those things that I feel I am not getting in my diet.
    I also drink a south american tea called yerba mate when I want an afternoon pick me up. the best brand is 'Guayaki' which has a nice chocolatte flavour or I make regular yerba mate into a cold limeade by adding lime and stevia ( you just shake a teabag in a water bottle and make instant iced tea!). Yerba mate is an herb which is caffeine free, but provides energy and produces mental clarity when you drink it. I believe it is also beneficial for the adrenals. It too has been used for centuries in South America! I found this brand at whole foods, but I am sure you will find the herb tea in some form at any healthfood store. It comes as green tea or roasted.
    There is so much information to get through when you are first diagnosed- I spent the first two months reading about it every night- I had never heard of hypothyroidism before I was diagnosed.
    Oh and I have read that it can take up to 3 months for herbs to begin working. But I really believe that they do!
    again i found the Herbal Defense book which I mentioned above to be the BEST source regarding herbs and their benefits that I have ever read. I first got my library to order it in for me, but was so impressed I ordered a copy. that is where I found out about yerba mate (but they do not talk about maca at all).
    Multivitamin, Fish Oil, Cinnamon B, complex Vit B6/B5 combo, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Vit D, Spirilina, Evening Primrose Oil (second half of cycle),Maca, Ashwaganda, milk thistle (for liver cleansing), synthroid (I am hypothyroid),High Fibre- IR diet, Daily Excercise. I am trying to gain all of the above vitamins from food sources (and would eventually like to only supplement with Fish Oils, Spirilina, vit d, and herbs).

  6. #6
    Registered User Angelo's Avatar
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    The hypothyroid diet should include an intake of iodine as studies have shown that a person needs to have a certain amount of iodine in their system in order for their body to function properly. There are iodine supplements available or you can use sea salt on some of your food to help increase your iodine levels.

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    Registered User tacos's Avatar
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    Just because you have hypothyroidism doesn't mean you have hashimoto's. If your doctor has not diagnosed you with hashimoto's, then don't worry about it. I highly doubt maca would damage your thyroid. I have subclinical hypothyroidism myself and I have been using it regularly with no adverse effects. Iodine is also excellent for your thyroid, especially if you have an under-active thyroid. Generally, there are a lot of sites with conflicting information. A lot of people who advocate synthetic chemical drugs to cover up symptoms of diseases will often spread inaccurate information to dissuade people from using alternatives.

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