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  1. #1
    Registered User lulu22's Avatar
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    Exclamation Statins and anxiety/insomnia!

    Hi,

    I just wanted to mention this here in case it is an issue for anyone else...

    I was prescribed Simvistatin for high cholesterol. I know a lot of us PCOSers who have IR also have high cholesterol. So, I just thought I'd mention here- I was on 5mg of simvistatin and it caused me horrible insomnia and made my anxiety SO much worse! I wasn't expecting these side effects, and indeed when I looked it up it looks like they are rare. However, I wish someone would have warned me! I guess because certain statins cross the blood/brain barrier, it affects your brain's ability to get or utilize cholesterol, which is bad because the brain needs fat!

    Anyway, it has been a horrible week for me on the medication... I went off last night and FINALLY had a solid night sleep! I had gone 6 days with only sleeping 2 hours a night on off and having nightmares.... and like I said my anxiety was much worse.

    I've seens websites that say if you have a history of anxiety or depression these side effects may be an issue.

    Just warning others...
    Me: 31 & DH: 36 (ttc 12/2012)

    PCOS since: 09/06, Dx'd via labwork/ultrasound: 05/07- Slightly High Testosterone, Bad IR, Adrenal fatigue, Syndrome X, Anxiety & Depression

    Things I'm doing now:
    Metformin 500mg, BCP, Blood pressure med, Anti-D
    Astaxanthin 8mg, Inositol & Choline 1500mg (for PCOS & Anxiety), Magnesium 400mg
    Exercising, Charting

  2. #2
    Registered User Smile04's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey, the brain actually needs glucose not fat, which is why people need carbohydrates which get metabolised into sugars like glucose. The brain can also utilise ketones but as a last resort if its short of glucose.

    Are you sure that by knowing that you were taking the statin actually caused your anxiety and insomnia rather that the drug itself causing it?

    I know that when I started taking a new drug few years ago when my anxiety was high that it worried me so much that I couldnt sleep and kept me anxious for a few days.

    Other than that, maybe you could try a different statin.
    Diagnosed April 04, sypmtoms started age 13/14
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  3. #3
    Registered User lulu22's Avatar
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    Default it was the statins...

    Hi Smile04,

    Yeah it was 100% the statins. They have done the research -here is an article:
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/409738_3

    And then a news article on it: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...ight-gain.html

    I know the brain needs glucose, but it also needs fat (myelin sheath function and all that). The body needs cholesterol for many reasons, which is why statins are a catagory X drug during pregnancy. http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/fats.html

    Thanks, but I'm no longer having side effects now that I'm off of it. Thank God!!

    -Lulu22
    Me: 31 & DH: 36 (ttc 12/2012)

    PCOS since: 09/06, Dx'd via labwork/ultrasound: 05/07- Slightly High Testosterone, Bad IR, Adrenal fatigue, Syndrome X, Anxiety & Depression

    Things I'm doing now:
    Metformin 500mg, BCP, Blood pressure med, Anti-D
    Astaxanthin 8mg, Inositol & Choline 1500mg (for PCOS & Anxiety), Magnesium 400mg
    Exercising, Charting

  4. #4
    Registered User Smile04's Avatar
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    Default

    but then surely they would take statins off the market if they disrupted nerve insulation in the brain =/ the body can also synthesise cholesterol de novo to make steroid hormones and bile.

    I cant read your first article because im not registered =(

    My endo wanted me to take statins but I said no, I was only 21 at the time and I didnt want to start taking them yet if I didnt really need them =/ my total cholesterol is only slightly elevated.


    Ahh its not all statins, just the lipophilic statins that breach the BBB but still, they sound dangerous =/
    Last edited by Smile04; 07-11-2011 at 08:24 PM.
    Diagnosed April 04, sypmtoms started age 13/14
    Amitriptyline (20mg)
    Aspirin (75mg)
    Levothyroxine (100mcg)
    Spironolactone (100mg)
    L-Lysine (1000mg)
    Ferrous Gluconate (300mg)
    Multivitamins
    Biotin (1000mg)
    Minoxidil 4% / Estradiol

  5. #5
    Registered User lulu22's Avatar
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    Default

    Well, I don't know about there in the UK, but here in the US the prescription drug lobbies often times supersede the good of the common (wo)man. So, unfortunately I wouldn’t put it past the US to leave something that disrupts nerve insulation on the market if it made enough money and kept the lobbyists happy. Actually, my Husband is from Europe, and whenever I am prescribed a medication I check with the general consensus of various EU medical boards or the equivalent of the US FDA, because I trust them more.

    For example- you know the over-the-counter stomach medication Motillium (domperidone)? We don’t have it here… because it has “anti-dopamergenic effects that are unsafe” or something to that affect, according to the FDA. However, domperidone is not known to cross the BBB. But here in the US they do prescribe Prochlopor (for anti-nausea, it acts the same as Motillium) only it DOES cross the BBB! So, there are loads of people in hospital here for say a migraine, being given things like Prochlorperazine for the nausea and having horrid hallucinations, panic attacks, suicidal ideation etc. because it crosses the BBB, and they are all too willing to dole it out and then after the fact say “oh yeah, it can do that sometimes!” But God forbid they let a drug like Motillium be sold in the pharmacy! *shaking my head* It’s dreadful really…

    Anyway, I’m not sure that statins would affect the health of myelin, but my point was that the brain does need fats. I’m really not sold on the safety of statins though… I mean, they just came out with the research against using the 80mg dose, who knows what else they will find out in time from longer term studies. If you do take them- make sure you are taking a good CoQ-10 supplement or ubiquinone with it.

    I was thinking about trying a hydrophilic statin instead. But, I’m young and my cholesterol isn’t that high either; my only qualm is that I have a high CRP which my doc is worried about, and a family history of heart disease so….

    It sure is a difficult thing to balance medications and side effects with quality of life though (nevermind the PCOS stuff even!).
    Me: 31 & DH: 36 (ttc 12/2012)

    PCOS since: 09/06, Dx'd via labwork/ultrasound: 05/07- Slightly High Testosterone, Bad IR, Adrenal fatigue, Syndrome X, Anxiety & Depression

    Things I'm doing now:
    Metformin 500mg, BCP, Blood pressure med, Anti-D
    Astaxanthin 8mg, Inositol & Choline 1500mg (for PCOS & Anxiety), Magnesium 400mg
    Exercising, Charting

  6. #6
    Registered User lulu22's Avatar
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    Exclamation Statins May Have A Negative Impact In Multiple Sclerosis Patients - FYI

    Statins May Have A Negative Impact In Multiple Sclerosis Patients
    ScienceDaily (May 28, 2009) — Statins, a commonly prescribed class of drugs used by millions worldwide to effectively lower blood cholesterol levels, may actually have a negative impact in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients treated with high daily dosages.
    ________________________________________

    A new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), McGill University, demonstrates that statin therapy in mice inhibits myelin repair or remyelination in the central nervous system. The findings, published in The American Journal of Pathology, highlight the crucial need to monitor the effects of central nervous system-accessible immune therapies on the myelin repair processes in patients with MS and other progressive demyelinating diseases.

    Canadians have one of the highest rates of MS in the world. An estimated 50, 000 Canadians have MS, with approximately 1,000 new cases diagnosed each year. MS is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), in which immune cells attack the myelin sheath (the protective insulation of nerve fibres), and the myelin-producing cells of the CNS (oligodendrocytes), causing demyelination. This causes damage which disrupts the nerve cell's ability to transmit signals throughout the nervous system.

    In the early stages of MS, following an immune system attack on myelin, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or stem cells in the CNS are recruited to the lesion. These cells mature and produce new myelin to repair the damage.

    "Statins, which are known to modify the immune system response and have a wide array of effects on other cellular processes, were propelled into clinical trials based on studies in an animal model of MS indicating a reduction in clinical disease severity," says Dr. Veronique Miron, post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Jack Antel's lab at the MNI, and lead investigator in the study. "The mechanism of statin action in these studies was not determined. That is, does statin directly effect myelin and/or the oligodendrocytes or is disease severity reduced indirectly due to the dampening of the immune response. This issue required further investigation, particularly due to the ability of statins to cross the blood-brain barrier and access the CNS, and the enrichment of cholesterol in the myelin sheath."

    The objective of the MNI study was to determine the direct impact of simvastatin, a statin in clinical trials, on the integrity of myelin in the brain and on the remyelination process. The study uses a model of myelin damage that has relatively little inflammation and mimics the demyelinating aspect of MS, allowing MNI researchers to determine the direct effect of long-term statin therapy on remyelination, independent of its indirect effects mediated via immune modulation.

    "The results of our study indicate that simvastatin has in fact, a slightly deleterious effect on myelin under non-pathological conditions," adds Dr. Miron. "During remyelination, there is a decrease not only in myelin production but also in oligodendrocyte number as a result of simvastatin treatment. The findings also suggest that simvastatin inhibits CNS remyelination by blocking oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation or maturation into myelinating oligodendrocytes."

    This study underscores the necessity of monitoring the long-terms effects of CNS accessible immune therapies, particularly those that can impact cell types that are postulated to be targeted in neurological disease processes and that are implicated in any brain tissue repair processes. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of these therapies will lead to improved and enhanced treatment strategies and ultimately improved quality of life for people who suffer from a variety of neurological diseases.
    Email or share this story:

    ________________________________________
    Story Source:
    The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by McGill University, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.
    ________________________________________
    Journal Reference:
    1. Veronique E. Miron, Simone P. Zehntner, Tanja Kuhlmann, Samuel K. Ludwin, Trevor Owens, Timothy E. Kennedy, Barry J. Bedell, and Jack P. Antel. Statin Therapy Inhibits Remyelination in the Central Nervous System. American Journal Of Pathology, 2009; 174 (5): 1880 DOI: 10.2353/ajpath.2009.080947

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0526094253.htm
    Me: 31 & DH: 36 (ttc 12/2012)

    PCOS since: 09/06, Dx'd via labwork/ultrasound: 05/07- Slightly High Testosterone, Bad IR, Adrenal fatigue, Syndrome X, Anxiety & Depression

    Things I'm doing now:
    Metformin 500mg, BCP, Blood pressure med, Anti-D
    Astaxanthin 8mg, Inositol & Choline 1500mg (for PCOS & Anxiety), Magnesium 400mg
    Exercising, Charting

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to lulu22 For This Useful Post:

    elypsis (11-30-2011)

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