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  1. #1
    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Default PCOS and Magnesium for insulin resistance?

    Does anyone know anything about this? I found the reference on amazon.com

    Click on this link: http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0345...&keywords=pcos

    ...then click on the PAGE 11 link.

    Kat

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    Super Moderator Ajani's Avatar
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    Kat, do you (or anyone else here) have an amazon.com account? You have to be logged in to view the page that you've mentioned.
    Dx 2002 after a year of my own research. That research and much prayer lead to our two blessings, born in 2004 and 2007. Hidden Content

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    in need of motivation snoopy24's Avatar
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    I think it's probably illegal to copy material from their copyrighted pages, but here goes:

    PCOS patients have a high incidence of insulin resistance and glucose tolerance. In a recent consultation, a young woman told me she had been advised to go on diabetic drugs, not because she has diabetes but because she has PCOS and the drugs we supposed to lower her insulin resistance. PCOS patients also tend to be at risk for hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Since a low magnesium ion level and a high calcium/magnesium ratio are associated with insulin resistance, cardiovascular problems, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, a study was done on a group of PCOS patients to determine the effects of magnesium intervention. Significantly lower levels of magnesium ions and total serum magnesium and a significantly higher calcium-ion-to-magnesium-ion ratio were found in the PCOS patients compared with the controls, which gave me enough evidence to recommend a magnesium supplement of 300 mg twice per day to treat my patientís insulin resistance and possibly her PCOS as well.
    from The Miracle of Magnesium by Carolyn Dean

    I think that's the first I've heard of significant link between magnesium and PCOS/IR, but I haven't done nearly as much research as some others here.
    Beth, 29
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    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Here's another refernce that I found:

    Magnesium deficiency has been clearly associated with insulin resistance. Conversely, a higher Mg level is associated with a greater degree of insulin sensitivity. (MB13) A Mg deficiency has been identified in 8 out of 10 type 1 diabetics, with supplementation reducing insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, serum cholesterol, LDL and ApoB levels. (MB14) Considering the link between polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and insulin resistance, it is not surprising that significantly lower Mg status is common to PCOS patients.
    Source: www.phytomedicine.com.au/files/nutrimedicine/ mag_biocomplex_tablets.pdf

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    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Default Another...

    4) Consider supplements that increase insulin sensitivity. Because so many factors are involved in blood glucose levels, a high-quality, comprehensive multi-vitamin/multi-mineral such as Professional Prenatal Formula, Optivite, or Androvite* is a basic starting point. Managing Morning Sickness explains the role of various vitamins and minerals in blood sugar control. Additionally, magnesium (1,000 mg per day), chromium, and vanadium are involved directly in regulation of the levels of insulin and the cellular response to insulin. Dr. Julian Whitaker recommends 400 mcg of chromium pico-linate daily, and 30 mg of vanadium daily for insulin resistance related to overweight. As always, discuss these recommendations with a nutritionally-aware health professional. (Dr. James Balch, author of Prescription for Nutritional Healing, points out that chromium picolinate is so effective at improving insulin sensitivity that individuals with diabetes should check with a nutritionally-aware physician before using it, as it may necessitate a change in their medication ).
    source: www.ccli.org/articles/pcos.shtml

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    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Magnesium levels have been found to be low in people with diabetes and there is a strong link between magnesium deficiency and insulin resistance. It is, therefore, an important mineral to include if you are suffering from PCOS.
    source: http://www.marilynglenville.com/general/polycystic.htm

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    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Metformin is our drug of choice for people who have blood sugar problems, uncontrollable by diet. We, in most cases, are able in time to get our patients off of metformin - but a small percentage are unable to every come off. With our program, they can keep the dosage as low as possible. With PCOS, specifically, the addition of a substantial amount of magnesium may be helpful. At our clinic we would even administer the magnesium intravenously to get the levels up quickly, failing that a dose of chelated magnesium in a dose of about 400-600 milligrams over time should help.
    source: chat transcript with Dr's Eades, authors of Protein Power
    nutrition.about.com/library/blpowerproteinchat.htm

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    Registered User andrena's Avatar
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    I've often heard that there's a link between PCOS/insulin resistance and calcium/magnesium deficiency. However, I was diagnosed with PCOS about 2 years ago and I have taken 600mg calcium and 250 mg magnesium - twice a day - for at least 10 years. Maybe it's just one of those 'everyone is different' things. I figure the calcium/magnesium can't hurt, maybe my symptoms would be even worse if I hadn't been taking it. However, it obviously didn't 'cure' me!

    Just my two cents!

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    tiger lovin cysta ava2002's Avatar
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    After reading this and thinking about another post I had read here, I decided that there had to be a connection. The other post was about cysters who had experienced irregular heart beat and had gotten no explanation from doctors. This site mentions that people with a mag defiecincy could experience irregular heart beats, as well. I'm posting a link to the site.

    http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshel...25,890,00.html

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    Tasmanian Cyster Tas's Avatar
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    Originally posted by andrena
    I've often heard that there's a link between PCOS/insulin resistance and calcium/magnesium deficiency. However, I was diagnosed with PCOS about 2 years ago and I have taken 600mg calcium and 250 mg magnesium - twice a day - for at least 10 years. Maybe it's just one of those 'everyone is different' things. I figure the calcium/magnesium can't hurt, maybe my symptoms would be even worse if I hadn't been taking it. However, it obviously didn't 'cure' me!

    Just my two cents!
    Maybe you don't need the calcium. One of the extracts says:

    "...significantly higher calcium-ion-to-magnesium-ion ratio were found in the PCOS patients compared with the controls, ..."

    Every time I've tried taking a combined calcium and magnesium supplement I am incredibly tired for the next 24 hours or so. As I know that calcium is supposed to help insomnia, and I get plenty of calcium from other sources, I have been going to try magnesium on its own but just haven't got around to it yet. Now I've got more reason to give it a go :-)

    Also, the quotes in this thread say '400-600mg' and '1000mg' of magnesium - maybe you haven't been taking enough.
    Cheers, Tas Hidden Content

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    Super Moderator Ajani's Avatar
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    I'm adding a link to this thread to our resources sticky.
    Dx 2002 after a year of my own research. That research and much prayer lead to our two blessings, born in 2004 and 2007. Hidden Content

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    Registered User Matilda2's Avatar
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    Drat! I've just bought a calcium/magnesium supplement, partly because I was worried I would not be able to absorb B12 without the calcium (because of the metformin.) Now I am paranoid....
    I can't help but wonder whether magnesium deficiency isn't an effect of insulin resistance, rather than a cause, which then makes the IR worse...interesting that such high doses were mentioned. Hah! I think calcium makes me tired too.

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    SoulCyster #1 KatCarney's Avatar
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    Default Low Magnesium Levels Tied to Syndrome X Risk

    Low Magnesium Levels Tied to Syndrome X Risk

    People with low cellular levels of magnesium, an essential mineral, may be at increased risk for Syndrome X, a group of health disorders that include insulin resistance plus high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, obesity, and certain age-related conditions.

    According to Mildred Seelig, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.C.N., "Low magnesium levels have been implicated as an important factor in most of the disorders of Metabolic Syndrome X." Syndrome X is also known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance occurs when the pancreas secretes adequate insulin, but the body gradually becomes resistant to it. To stabilize high blood sugar levels, the pancreas will continue to secrete higher and higher amounts of insulin, but high levels of glucose and insulin can lead to the other health disorders that increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Insulin resistance is a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

    Low magnesium, it seems, causes insulin resistance and is a marker for type 2 diabetes. But it is also associated with each of the disorders of Syndrome X. Unfortunately, most Americans don't meet the RDA for magnesium. For women, the RDA is 320 milligrams (mg) a day; for men that amount is 420 mg.

    Dr. Larry Resnick of Cornell University has conducted numerous clinical studies investigating the relationship between magnesium intake and health, specifically its effect on the heart. He theorizes that low ionic magnesium causes insulin resistance and that Syndrome X is caused by a low ratio of magnesium ions to a high ratio of calcium in the cells. Magnesium facilitates glucose uptake by the cells, promotes healthy heart function and blunts the damage caused by free radicals.

    Magnesium is involved in insulin secretion and utilization. Many people who are diabetic are magnesium deficient. In a recent examination of 22 research papers on type 2 diabetes, nearly half of all patients were magnesium deficient and a third more had suboptimal levels.

    Even in seemingly healthy, non diabetic patients, low magnesium levels have been detected and linked to relative insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and a high secretion of insulin. Magnesium can have a modest, yet significant effect on glucose utilization.

    High blood pressure or hypertension is one of the disorders associated with Syndrome X. It should come as no surprise, then, that magnesium has been shown to be lower high blood pressure. In one study of people with high blood pressure, patients who received magnesium for four weeks showed a significant reduction in blood pressure compared to those who received a placebo.

    How does magnesium affect blood pressure? High levels of calcium in the cells contract the muscle of arterial walls, while magnesium has the opposite effect. It relaxes blood vessels, causing them to dilate. Obesity, especially if it is excess weight around the stomach, in and of itself is associated with increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure as well as high cholesterol and insulin levels. Researchers have called it the "deadly quartet" because it's often seen in men who die of cardiovascular disease. It's usually related to high levels of cellular ionic calcium and low levels of magnesium.

    People with Syndrome X often have high total cholesterol levels (above 240 mg/dl) and high triglycerides (above 160 mg/dl) but low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL-C), considered the good form of cholesterol. Magnesium appears to have a positive effect decreasing harmful cholesterol and increasing good cholesterol.9 It also prevents blood platelets from sticking together that cause heart attack and stroke.

    As we age, our cells become more vulnerable to ion disturbances and Syndrome X becomes more common. Some researchers, including Resnick, believe that a depletion of ionic magnesium in our cells can make us more vulnerable for many age-related conditions.10 In addition, oxidative stress, or damage to our tissues and organs caused by harmful free radicals contributes as well.

    Within the last ten years, researchers have discovered that a magnesium deficiency unleashes free radicals that, in animals, damaged the heart and the inner linings of blood vessels. Increasing magnesium intake, however, can protect the heart against damage caused by free radicals.

    Green vegetables and nuts are great food sources of magnesium. But despite the fact that most people have plenty to eat, large segments of the population still appear to consume insufficient amounts of magnesium.

    To fortify your intake, you can take magnesium supplements. In general, look for supplements that contain ionic forms of magnesium. Other forms such as magnesium oxide and hydroxide can be more difficult to digest and assimilate. As we grow older, we secrete less stomach acid and these forms may not be well-absorbed.

    http://www.newliving.com/issues/sept...magnesium.html

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    Registered User AngieNC35's Avatar
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    SO how much would you suggest taking ? in one article it said 400-600 mg and then in another it said 320mg ??? I have to go to the vitamin store anyway for DH so thought about picking some up while there. Thanks for the advice.

    Angie
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    Tasmanian Cyster Tas's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Tas
    ...Every time I've tried taking a combined calcium and magnesium supplement I am incredibly tired for the next 24 hours or so. As I know that calcium is supposed to help insomnia, and I get plenty of calcium from other sources, I have been going to try magnesium on its own but just haven't got around to it yet. Now I've got more reason to give it a go :-)...
    Well, I just bought some this afternoon and took it. I don't feel sleepy like I normally do with the calcium added, in fact I feel more awake than I did before, but that might be from the good dinner I had. We'll see how it goes.
    Cheers, Tas Hidden Content

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